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America's Counter-Revolution
The Constitution Revisited

From the back cover:

This book challenges the assumption that the Constitution was a landmark in the struggle for liberty. Instead, Sheldon Richman argues, it was the product of a counter-revolution, a setback for the radicalism represented by America’s break with the British empire. Drawing on careful, credible historical scholarship and contemporary political analysis, Richman suggests that this counter-revolution was the work of conservatives who sought a nation of “power, consequence, and grandeur.” America’s Counter-Revolution makes a persuasive case that the Constitution was a victory not for liberty but for the agendas and interests of a militaristic, aristocratic, privilege-seeking ruling class.

Friday, April 14, 2017

TGIF: What a Perverse Presidential Incentive System!

All I can say is, we’ve got a hell of a political system on our hands when the surest way for a president to win the adoration of those who thought him a dangerous, ignorant, narcissistic, erratic, and bullshitting blowhard yesterday is to drop a bomb or fire a cruise missile today.

Read TGIF at The Libertarian Institute.

TGIF (The Goal Is Freedom) appears on Fridays. Sheldon Richman, author of America's Counter-Revolution: The Constitution Revisited, keeps the blog Free Association and is executive editor of The Libertarian Institute. He is also a senior fellow and chair of the trustees of the Center for a Stateless Society and a contributing editor at Antiwar.com. Become a Free Association patron today!

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

If bombs are not droped, then there is no more room left to store new bombs. Then, the new bombs will be bought by someone else, like the Eskimos, who believe that all southern peoples are lazy and evil and ugly and deserve to die. And I can't fid arguments against such powerful line of reasoning.
Therefore, we have to make sure no weapon reaches the hands of our enemies: the northern peoples beyond the Wall. And if we have to have perpetual war amongst us, so be it.

Aisling Abbandonato said...

From a reason.com piece you wrote, "How refreshing it would be for someone to set forth the strongest case for libertarianism before attempting to eviscerate it. Is the failure to do so a sign of fear that the philosophy is potentially appealing to a great many people?"

My friends and I would really like to debate a worthy libertarian opponent who can actually make a strong case in favor of libertarianism, but we cannot seem to find one. We were hoping to find someone at least as principled as Rothbard, but we have found no one of the sort, and with such unworthy opponents, our attack is also weak -- namely, that our opponents seem unwilling to live up to any of their own stated ideals and, furthermore, that they actively fight against people who are indeed fighting for specific causes of an allegedly libertarian nature. For example, we haven't found a single libertarian, as of yet, who is willing to take up the cause of fighting chattel slavery, even when only minimal efforts are requested, and we've found a number who consider even stating that chattel slavery still exists in the world to be an attack against libertarianism. We would welcome the opportunity to talk to a more competent opponent.

Sheldon Richman said...

"we've found a number who consider even stating that chattel slavery still exists in the world to be an attack against libertarianism." I can't imagine any libertarian taking this position.