Available Now! (click cover)

America's Counter-Revolution
The Constitution Revisited

From the back cover:

This book challenges the assumption that the Constitution was a landmark in the struggle for liberty. Instead, Sheldon Richman argues, it was the product of a counter-revolution, a setback for the radicalism represented by America’s break with the British empire. Drawing on careful, credible historical scholarship and contemporary political analysis, Richman suggests that this counter-revolution was the work of conservatives who sought a nation of “power, consequence, and grandeur.” America’s Counter-Revolution makes a persuasive case that the Constitution was a victory not for liberty but for the agendas and interests of a militaristic, aristocratic, privilege-seeking ruling class.

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

The Irony of the Zimmerman-Martin Case

Funny, if anyone can be said to have stood his ground rather than retreat, it was Trayvon Martin.

9 comments:

Grung_e_Gene said...

Martin was guilty of being black in America.

Sheldon Richman said...

I see no evidence for that. I can't help but think that those who keep saying that in light of the evidence at trial are guilty of racially profiling Zimmerman.

David T. Beito said...

Are you serious? Zimmerman's allegation is that Zimmerman walked over to where he was standing, jumped him, and started pummeling with blows. If true, that is an act of active aggression and initiation of force, not self-defense. An example of stand your ground would be if M. is was first attacked and chose to fight back. A person doesn't have a right to attack someone under SYG if they are merely being followed. Now....maybe M. attacked first, but I don't know of anyone in the case who makes that argument.

Sheldon Richman said...

I think you mean Martin walked over, not Zimmerman. You miss my point. I was pointing to an irony in the complaint about stand your ground. If you believe the prosecution's account, then Martin did something like stand his ground. I don't say I believe that account. The prosecution neither carried its burden or proof nor impeached the self-defense account.

David T. Beito said...

Sorry. Not enough coffee. I missed the irony at first glance and agree with you.

Sheldon Richman said...

The word irony was in the title but not in the text. My bad?

John Ahrens said...

No irony. If some creepy guy followed me in his car, then got out and confronted me, and I thought (or saw) that he had a gun, beating him into unconsciousness, rather than trying to flee, might seem just the thing.

Sheldon Richman said...

I don't agree with your account of the case. But that aside,the irony is that the pro-Martin side wants "stand your ground" repealed because in their (mistaken) view it let Zimmerman get away with murder.

JOR said...

A greater irony is that he was retro-actively sentenced to death for it with no due process.