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America's Counter-Revolution
The Constitution Revisited

From the back cover:

This book challenges the assumption that the Constitution was a landmark in the struggle for liberty. Instead, Sheldon Richman argues, it was the product of a counter-revolution, a setback for the radicalism represented by America’s break with the British empire. Drawing on careful, credible historical scholarship and contemporary political analysis, Richman suggests that this counter-revolution was the work of conservatives who sought a nation of “power, consequence, and grandeur.” America’s Counter-Revolution makes a persuasive case that the Constitution was a victory not for liberty but for the agendas and interests of a militaristic, aristocratic, privilege-seeking ruling class.

Monday, March 05, 2012

For the Record

Updated below
In a post at the LRC Blog, "Charles Koch Makes a Good Point," Tom DiLorenzo writes this:
Sheldon Richman, who was working as CATO's publications editor at the time, seemed deeply embarrassed that the op-eds I was sending him, at his request, were constantly being returned to me with such heavy editing by an anonymous person (to me) who seemed to be on the same ideological wave length as a Ted Kennedy or a neocon like Newt Gingrich. I was apparently too much of a Misesian and not enough of an intellectual prostitute for CATO, so they dropped me as an adjunct scholar....
I wish to put on the record that this is untrue. I have requested a retraction.

Update: The latest version of the post now says this:
CATO's publications editor at the time seemed embarrassed that the op-eds I was sending him, at his request, were constantly being returned to me with such heavy editing by an anonymous person (to me) who seemed to be on the same ideological wave length as a leftist like Ted Kennedy or a neocon like Newt Gingrich. I was apparently too much of a Misesian and not enough of an intellectual prostitute for CATO, so they dropped me as an adjunct scholar.... [Emphasis added.]
My name has been removed. An email exchange between me and Tom DiLorenzo makes clear that he had his timeline confused. His post refers to a time when I was not working at Cato. I appreciate that he removed my name from the account.

3 comments:

Michael Morrison said...

Granted I'm naive, even ignorant, certainly behind the times.
But, please, when did the Koch Brothers become bad guys?
Michael Morrison

Sheldon Richman said...

You'll have to decide for yourself. Read the blogosphere to see what's going on with Cato.

Nicolas Martin said...

Michael, Murray Rothbard dated it to 1981.