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America's Counter-Revolution
The Constitution Revisited

From the back cover:

This book challenges the assumption that the Constitution was a landmark in the struggle for liberty. Instead, Sheldon Richman argues, it was the product of a counter-revolution, a setback for the radicalism represented by America’s break with the British empire. Drawing on careful, credible historical scholarship and contemporary political analysis, Richman suggests that this counter-revolution was the work of conservatives who sought a nation of “power, consequence, and grandeur.” America’s Counter-Revolution makes a persuasive case that the Constitution was a victory not for liberty but for the agendas and interests of a militaristic, aristocratic, privilege-seeking ruling class.

Saturday, January 15, 2011

Nothing Natural about It

The sharp historical division between labor and capital ownership is not a natural emergent feature of the market economy but largely the conscious result of government privilege.

8 comments:

Wirkman Virkkala said...

I would have said "inflation and the boom/bust cycle."

Sheldon Richman said...

That too.

Julia Riber Pitt said...

I've heard that argument for a long time, that market economies "naturally become dominated by a few firms" but never with much context to it. It makes sense that cartels and monopolies could only occur under a capitalist/statist system. Do you know of any good information on the topic?

Anonymous said...

I'd like for it to be true, but if I made that assertion and somebody called me on it the best argument I could make would be an argument from authority. My friends wouldn't find that argument persuasive.

Sheldon Richman said...

You can find historical information in Franz Oppenheimer's The State; Albert Jay Nock's Our Enemy, The State; Arthur Ekirch's The Decline of American Liberalism, Kevin Carson's Studies in Mutualist Political Economy and Organization Theory: A Libertarian Perspective. Carson will direct you to more books and articles.

N. Joseph Potts said...

Labor and capital became separated in their efforts to exclude each other from control of the government (and so, to control it exclusively). Without government power to fight over, the two would end up with no rational course of action but to cooperate overtly.

Julia Riber Pitt said...

Thanks Sheldon. I'll check it out.

ToryII said...

I didn't read the article or publication. Did it mention Boycott ? Self-sufficient Iran ?