Available Now! (click cover)

America's Counter-Revolution
The Constitution Revisited

From the back cover:

This book challenges the assumption that the Constitution was a landmark in the struggle for liberty. Instead, Sheldon Richman argues, it was the product of a counter-revolution, a setback for the radicalism represented by America’s break with the British empire. Drawing on careful, credible historical scholarship and contemporary political analysis, Richman suggests that this counter-revolution was the work of conservatives who sought a nation of “power, consequence, and grandeur.” America’s Counter-Revolution makes a persuasive case that the Constitution was a victory not for liberty but for the agendas and interests of a militaristic, aristocratic, privilege-seeking ruling class.

Friday, February 03, 2017

TGIF: Trump's Blueprint for More Government

Donald Trump remains blinded -- willfully or not I cannot say -- by his absurd narrative of America as an aggrieved nation. It's a narrative that will stimulate the growth, rather than the diminution, of government power.

Read TGIF at The Libertarian Institute.

TGIF (The Goal Is Freedom) appears on Fridays. Sheldon Richman, author of America's Counter-Revolution: The Constitution Revisited, keeps the blog Free Association and is executive editor of The Libertarian Institute. He is also a senior fellow and chair of the trustees of the Center for a Stateless Society and a contributing editor at Antiwar.com. Become a Free Association patron today!

4 comments:

August said...

So far, all this narrative has done is help end multi-national, artificially constructed 'free markets.'
Trump is seeking bilateral agreements.
We haven't actually seen one of these yet. It may be closer to free trade than what we have now. Trump is a business man. He says 'America first', but he also knows trade actually has to happen for it to benefit Americans. All the extra jobs he wants aren't going to happen if there is no trade.

Sheldon Richman said...

Trump sees the world in zero-sum terms. I doubt his trade agreements will look anything like free trade. His insistence on "fair trade" is the giveaway. He opposes letting other countries' producers profit from their comparative advantages over American producers.

August said...

Yes, but politicians saying 'free trade' haven't really brought us free trade. We've got this global corporatism instead.

So, it matters less what his ideology is, and more what his instincts are.

Tony M. said...

Good post.