Available Now! (click cover)

America's Counter-Revolution
The Constitution Revisited

From the back cover:

This book challenges the assumption that the Constitution was a landmark in the struggle for liberty. Instead, Sheldon Richman argues, it was the product of a counter-revolution, a setback for the radicalism represented by America’s break with the British empire. Drawing on careful, credible historical scholarship and contemporary political analysis, Richman suggests that this counter-revolution was the work of conservatives who sought a nation of “power, consequence, and grandeur.” America’s Counter-Revolution makes a persuasive case that the Constitution was a victory not for liberty but for the agendas and interests of a militaristic, aristocratic, privilege-seeking ruling class.

Friday, November 02, 2007

Paul W. Tibbits Jr. Is Dead


Paul W. Tibbits Jr. died yesterday. He was 92. Tibbits lived 62 years and nearly three months longer than the 140,000 Japanese he helped murder when he piloted the Enola Gay, the American B-29 Superfortress from which the first atomic bomb was dropped in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945.

12 comments:

LarryRuane said...

Tibbets said that all his life, he did not regret dropping the bomb. I wonder if he regrets it now.

David Houser said...

That would be a rather small consolation to all those he immolated, wouldn't it?

Mike said...

At least this Man had the balls to do what he had to for is country. Gen Tibbits is a great man and a true Patriot. We all breathe freely today because of men like him. Those who lambaste the General and men like him are the epitome of serf-serving hypocrisy. Show some respect.

David Houser said...

"At least this Man had the balls to do what he had to for is country."

Just like Custer and the guards at Auschwitz. No respect due, none given.

Sheldon Richman said...

You call that balls? Vaporizing children and other innocents from the sky? Balls would have meant defying that evil order.

Mike said...

Yes Balls. Imagine having to make the decision to carry out such a task, all the while knowing the terrible implications. He knew that it was the lesser of two evils. The alternative was a costly and protracted battle for the Japanese homeland. History has shown that the decision to carry out the bombing saved lives in the end- both American and Japanese. The world is not a comfortable place for idealists, sir, and sometimes what must be done is not the ideal.

Jimi G said...

Gotta take the good with the bad, Sheldon. That's the price of blogging these days. Mike is certainly entitled to his opinion, as ill-informed and utilitarian as it may be.

As for me and my piddling dos centavos, as an atheist I sincerely hope that God has mercy on Mr. Tibbett's soul. I really really do.

Sheldon Richman said...

Mike:
The Japanese had been suing for peace for months. You can look it up. All they asked was that they keep the emperor, which Truman eventually allowed. You and I have a very notion of "balls."

beebs said...

I had an uncle who was a Marine in some of the later battles against the empire of Japan.

He always said that the bombs saved a lot more people than they killed. He was in one of the first Marine units entering Nagasaki, and he said they already had the invasion beaches staked out for mortar fire, and had issued grenades to all the women and children to meet the Marines on the beach.

Anonymous said...

I think the people on this forum who think he did wrong have never served their country in the military. They are the few among us content with others protecting their sorry asses. The freedom we enjoy today may very well be a direct result of Tibbitts dedication and precision as a military officer.

limey said...

I could not agree more with the anonymous comment. Dont question the way in which the military protects you when you need to be protected. Dont shit where you eat. If you dont like the freedom that the military provides you, feel free to leave the country

M.K. Walker said...

He also lived sixty-six years and some months longer than his fellow soldiers/sailors/civilians that were killed in the brutal surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. If you decry the actions of Gen. Tibbets, you should also decry even more the acts of the Japanese Empire in 1941. If you do not, you are honorless cowards.